Time for tea

When I hear people say I’m not happy it makes me sad because I then start to think about how I can make them happy especially when it’s good friends or family. But where does it say that people should be happy all the time? Surely you need to high and lows of life to add contrast to living.

Time for teaSo how can you define happiness because I’m sure it’s different for everyone depending on your circumstances? One thing I do know is that I missed many clues and signposts for things that might have made me smile because I was always dashing here there and everywhere to meetings and appointments, I was cramming too much into a day than was humanly possible in the vain belief that I was working efficiently and effectively. When in reality I was missing the detail the little nuances that makes us human, the visual clues that people give to you when talking.

Thesaurus describes happiness as contentment, serenity, gladness, pleasure, ease, joy and delight. It’s not surprising therefore to learn that your mood can have a big impact at work on how you interact with colleagues, your productivity and concentration. Happy people tend to stay with the employers twice as long and take fewer sick days, so it’s important for companies to help us stay happy at work. Its makes financial sense for companies to invest in programmes that help staff stay well by saving money on recruitment and training and continuity of service and development of people.

We can all help ourselves by eating well, exercising and sleeping the recommended number of hours to give our bodies a chance and keeping us ticking over. But we also need to promote a culture within the workplace that encourages staff to move away from their desk and take a proper old fashioned lunch break. I say bring back the Tea trolley as that was a great physical prompt to people to stop for a few minutes and take time out. No one ever felt guilty about stopping work and walking over to their trolley and having a chat.